Month: September 2014

Warranties in Three Sentences

texas contract warrantyA warranty is an agreement that accompanies a sale of goods/services, by which the seller obligates itself to vouch for the condition or quality of the goods/services. It is a separate promise from the promise to provide the goods/services and, as such, may be legally enforced independent of the promise to provide. Warranties may be written or verbal, express or implied.

In our Law 101 posts, we define terms, phrases, or concepts with the goal of conveying core information in order to set the stage for more complex discussions.

Architecture in Three Sentences

texas architectsAccording to the Texas Occupations Code, architecture is “a service or creative work applying the art and science of developing design concepts, planning for functional relationships and intended uses, and establishing the form, appearance, aesthetics, and construction details for the construction, enlargement, or alteration of a building or environs intended for human use or occupancy….” But architects can do much more than design. For example, they are often asked to administer a construction contract to: (1) ensure construction conforms to construction documents; (2) support the design intent; (3) lessen project risks; (4) identify and resolve construction problems early; and (5) supplement the client’s construction knowledge.

 In our Law 101 posts, we define terms, phrases, or concepts with the goal of conveying core information in order to set the stage for more complex discussions.

So What Exactly Do You Need to See? (Required Inspections — Part 2)

texas required inspectionsCertain aspects of the construction process must be inspected by the authority having jurisdiction over the development process. A general overview of required inspections is here. In that post, we listed mechanical, electrical, and plumbing as examples of different inspections that may be necessary. But what specific inspections are required?

It depends on the applicable law. In the City of Dallas, at least of the time of this post, a person may reasonably expect the following:

A. Required Building Inspections

  1. Foundation
  2. Rough frame
  3. Finish frame
  4. Insulation
  5. Final building

B. Required Electrical Inspections

  1. Temporary construction power pole
  2. Rough (when any electrical equipment or wiring is to be hidden from view by any permanent portion of the building or by burial)
  3. Final (after structure is completed)

C. Required Plumbing Inspections

  1. Rough (when any sewer, gas, or water piping is to be hidden from view)
  2. Final (after structure is completed)

D. Required Mechanical Inspections

  1. Rough and duct (before work is concealed from view by a permanent portion of the structure or by burial and before ducts are insulated)
  2. Final (after structure is completed)

E. Required Irrigation Inspections

  1. Rough (performed by reviewing irrigation designs and inspecting prior to the concealment of irrigation piping, control valves, and wiring)
  2. Final (after structure is completed)

F. Special/Other Inspections

  • A building official may also make or require any other inspection of any construction work to ascertain compliance with codes and ordinances

So, what do you think? Overkill or a good idea to have these systems reviewed?

In our Law 101 posts, we define terms, phrases, or concepts with the goal of conveying core information in order to set the stage for more complex discussions.